Borlotti Beans

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Borlotti Borlotti beans: Borlotti beans, also known as cranberry beans or French horticultural beans, are off-white beans with red markings. When you can find them fresh they come in large beige and red pods with colors that resemble the dried beans. In the shell the borlotti's bright colored pods make a festive table accent. The shell is inedible, but the borlotti beans inside are a culinary treat. Nutty in flavor with a creamy texture, borlotti are popular in Italian and Portuguese cusine. In fact, many of the borlotti sold in Italy are cranberry beans imported from the U.S..

Dried Borlotti beans are more readily available than fresh and have a much longer shelf life. Fresh borlotti beans should be used within a week or so, but the dried variety will keep as long as other types of dried beans. Dried borlotti can be soaked overnight and the simmered under water or stock with vegetables and or meats. When cooked the beans will lose some of their bright markings and turn a light brown color. Their meaty, chestnut flavor make borlotti a wonderful main dish and a perfect side dish. Not particularly sweet, the beans can be tossed with EVOO and your choice of spices. The next time you're feeling adventurous, but not wanting to take to big a risk, try borlotti beans! They are similar too, and can be substituted by tongues of fire beans which are very close, or you can use cannellini beans, Great Northerns or pintos. Borlotti make an excellent cold bean salad, soak and cook them as you would any other dried bean (approx. 30 minutes cooking time) and then toss them with olive oil and a little Italian salad dressing, or lemon and herbs.

 

    Borlotti Beans Facts:
  • Borlotti beans are also known as cranberry beans or French horticultural beans
  • Borlotti are popular in Italian and Portuguese cusine
  • Borlotti beans have a nutty flavor and creamy texture
  • Turn a light brown when cooked and lose their bright colors
  • Substitutes: tongues of fire beans, cannellini beans, Great Northern or pintos
  • Excellent in soups and stews, as well as cold bean salads
Nutritional data per 100g dried Borlotti:

  • Alanine - 0.965 g
  • Arginine - 1.426 g
  • Ash - 3.31 g
  • Aspartic acid - 2.785 g
  • Calcium, Ca - 127 mg
  • Carbohydrate, by difference - 60.05 g
  • Copper, Cu - 0.794 mg
  • Cystine - 0.251 g
  • Energy - 1402 kj
  • Energy - 335 kcal
  • Fatty acids, total monounsaturated - 0.106 g
  • Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated - 0.527 g
  • Fatty acids, total saturated - 0.316 g
  • Fiber, total dietary - 24.7 g
  • Folate, DFE - 604 mcg_DFE
  • Folate, food - 604 mcg
  • Folate, total - 604 mcg
  • Glutamic acid - 3.511 g
  • Glycine - 0.899 g
  • Histidine - 0.641 g
  • Iron, Fe - 5.00 mg
  • Isoleucine - 1.017 g
  • Leucine - 1.838 g
  • Lysine - 1.580 g
  • Magnesium, Mg - 156 mg
  • Manganese, Mn - 0.920 mg
  • Methionine - 0.346 g
  • Niacin - 1.455 mg
  • Pantothenic acid - 0.748 mg
  • Phenylalanine - 1.245 g
  • Phosphorus, P - 372 mg
  • Potassium, K - 1332 mg
  • Proline - 0.976 g
  • Protein - 23.03 g
  • Riboflavin - 0.213 mg
  • Selenium, Se - 12.7 mcg
  • Serine - 1.253 g
  • Sodium, Na - 6 mg
  • Thiamin - 0.747 mg
  • Threonine - 0.969 g
  • Total lipid (fat) - 1.23 g
  • Tryptophan - 0.273 g
  • Tyrosine - 0.648 g
  • Valine - 1.205 g
  • Vitamin A, IU - 2 IU
  • Vitamin B-6 - 0.309 mg
  • Water - 12.39 g
  • Zinc, Zn - 3.63 mg
  • Borlotti Beans
    Borlotti Beans

    Where to buy: Borlotti Beans